The Movement of Rings by Nadine C. Keels

The Movement of Rings
A Novella
Sequel to The Movement of Crowns
(Historical Fantasy, Love Story)

25 Favorite Books pick on Tell Tale Book Reviews, 2013

“As I said about its predecessor, Rings is a joy to read. The story is always inspiring, especially to young women… 5/5–wonderful!”  ~Kelly Smith Reviews
“With fully developed characters, a bit of sass and spirit, faith woven within, and turmoil mixed throughout, The Movement of Rings is an outstanding sequel.” ~Savurbks

What lies deeper than fear?

The Mundayne empire has prospered under the rule of King Aud, a ruthless man of war. Naona, a spirited imperial servant who holds Aud’s favor, enjoys pulling pranks on her peers around the king’s estate. But the time for laughter spoils when the citizens of Munda begin to oppose the taxes that pay for Aud’s wars.

After meeting the princess of Diachona, Naona must choose between remaining loyal to her king and becoming another nation’s ally. With the rise of unrest in Munda, how can Naona’s heart survive intact: intact enough, even, for a chance at love with a foreign man?

~~~

Pick up a copy of The Movement of Rings

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Don’t miss the final book in the series, The Movement of Kings, or get the entire series in one volume.

And don’t miss the spin-offs from this series!

Reviving the Commander picks up about a year after the Movement of Crowns series.
Eubeltic Descent picks up more than a century after the Movement of Crowns series.

There are a few ways you can stay updated on Nadine’s books. Find them here!

 

My Dearest Dietrich: A Novel of Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Lost Love by Amanda Barratt

Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me. I received a complimentary copy of this book, for which I’ve given an honest review.

My Dearest Dietrich: A Novel of Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Lost Love by Amanda Barratt

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

(Click the title to find the book description/blurb.)

A nearly middle-aged German theologian and pastor who’s forbidden to preach, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, lives in constant danger as a double agent during World War II, involved in plans to assassinate Hitler. The last thing he might have expected during this dark and dangerous time would be to fall in love with young Maria von Wedemeyer in My Dearest Dietrich: A Novel of Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Lost Love by author Amanda Barratt.

This biographical novel must have been on my radar about a year or so before I finally read it, having picked up from the cover and title what kind of love story it would be, and knowing much about how it would end.

When I already know where a story is going, it takes more than just “going there” to keep me interested. The sensitive and nuanced way the author develops Dietrich and Maria in this novel kept me, a longtime historical fiction devotee, not only interested but engrossed.

Yes, it’s a sober, heartrending read of faith, as I expected. It also has wonderful imagery, and the scattered moments of joy are earned. The romance here is one of the meeting of minds, a slow burn of emotional depth made more intense through ever-lurking peril.

Admittedly, I became a bit annoyed at the hero and heroine a time or two, even knowing the events are true, and I came across some minor predictability in the writing here and there (as well as the repeated use of the word “stationary” where it should say stationery, in reference to writing materials).

But I ached at times through the tragedy and beauty of this story. And reading it impressed upon me the more how crucial it is for us not to merely romanticize history but to purposely learn from it—and to remember it in the midst of our critical present.

 

For Beautiful Black Boys Who Believe in a Better World by Michael W. Waters

Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me. I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher for an honest review.

For Beautiful Black Boys Who Believe in a Better World by Michael W. Waters, Keisha Morris

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

(Click the title to find the book description/blurb.)

Jeremiah is a kid with questions. Questions about real-life events that are hard to talk about. Perhaps there’s some way for Jeremiah to deal with the realities of racism and gun violence in For Beautiful Black Boys Who Believe in a Better World by author Michael W. Waters, illustrated by Keisha Morris.

No, I don’t pick up very many children’s picture books these days. But as soon as I got my hands on this one, I went through and looked at all of the illustrations first.

I felt the tug of tears before I even read a word.

Yes, I did go back and read the words afterward, taking my time to absorb young Jeremiah’s journey along with the awesome artwork, appreciating this serious and accessible story of perplexity, grief, frustration, love, and compassion. A poignant story that’s handled with respect, wisdom, and an inspiring measure of hope.

And the most delightful part for me while reading this book? Watching Jeremiah’s great hair!

Indeed, children of all colors and backgrounds need stories like this. Teach children early on, long before they end up as teenagers or adults who are uninformed—or misinformed with a lot to unlearn.

Oh, and there’s a detailed guide in the back of the book to help with starting these important discussions in the classroom or at home. Excellent!

I love the illustrations in this book!

 

Cindi/Ella: When Shoes Speak by Bokerah Brumley

Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me.

Cindi/Ella: When Shoes Speak by Bokerah Brumley

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

(Click the title to find the book description/blurb.)

After Cindi moves to small-town Paris, Texas to help out at her aging grandmother’s dress shop, a stunning pair of crystal shoes in the clothier shop next door grabs Cindi’s interest—and won’t let go. Principe, who serves his cruel uncle in the next-door shop, is determined to keep Cindi away from the deadly shoes in Cindi/Ella: When Shoes Speak by author Bokerah Brumley.

Yeah, it was the (Victorian steampunk-inspired?) book cover that drew me to this contemporary retelling of a classic fairy tale. The look is striking, appearing outside of my normal fantasy fiction preferences, but as I’ve enjoyed this author before, I went for it.

The tale was slow-going for me for a while, but given its short novella length, I stuck with it. Good thing I did, because I came to rather like Ainsworth, the talking mouse, and I was drawn in more as the story darkened, becoming more twisted, but not in a way that was too dark for me.

Some typos had me rereading sentences to catch their meaning, but it wasn’t a big or frequent deal. And the story’s climax? Fantastic!

No, this retelling isn’t a steampunk story, but I’m glad the cover got my attention anyway.

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A Modern Fairy Tale Collection

 

The Hero Feat of Hannah Helstrom by J. Philip Horne

Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me.

The Hero Feat of Hannah Helstrom: Guild of Sevens 2.5 by J. Philip Horne

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

(Click the title to find the book description/blurb.)

Other superheroes in the Guild of Sevens have powers that fifteen-year-old Hannah doesn’t have. She considers herself to be the worst Seven of them all, but she’s stubborn as all get-out—and her moment to prove it arrives in The Hero Feat of Hannah Helstrom by author J. Philip Horne.

First off: WOW to this!

Now, I should probably say Hannah’s moment to “prove it” is her moment to “use it,” as this isn’t a “prove myself to everybody” story but a “use what I have when it’s needed” story.

It’s pretty amazing because even though it was no shock to find out what Hannah’s moment would be, her journey to get there and the way she navigates through it is still so compelling. Hannah’s training, mettle, heart, unselfishness, and quick thinking come into play in the face of an incredibly daunting task. Yet, she’s so down-to-earth (with a little edge of dry humor) that she keeps the story real instead of corny.

As this short, coming-of-age fantasy read is a standalone from the Guild of Sevens middle grade series, it makes me curious about the “WOW” that may be in the novels.

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Guild of Sevens Series