The Midwife’s Tale by Delia Parr

Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me. Bethany House provided me with a complimentary copy of this book for an honest review.
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9780764217333The Midwife’s Tale by Delia Parr

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

(Click the title to find the book description/blurb.)

Before she worried about facing her friends and neighbors, as well as her family…she had to face herself. Honestly. And without pretense.

I’ll confess that The Midwife’s Tale by Delia Parr is yet another book for which I didn’t remember whatever the book blurb had said before I started reading the book. I barely skimmed the blurb, but the cover of the novel is what got me, not so much on account of its loveliness but because the heroine depicted has gray in her hair. It’s nice to read about a more mature protagonist when I can, and Martha certainly has her hands full in this story of small-town life, some suspense, and hints of romance.

As far as midwifery goes, it was interesting to see it as a system and culture, not just a lone woman who appears to deliver a baby and disappears from the story again. Though the novel is officially labeled as historical romance, it’s rather light on the romance piece, but it’s more a story of Martha’s journey of grief, joy, self-discovery, and faith. There are some pretty endearing moments of character interaction, humorous or downright cute, and one duo of ladies in town couldn’t help but to remind me of the Baldwin sisters from The Waltons.

While much of this novel is easy reading, not unpleasant, it does move slowly, and halfway through the book, the story didn’t seem to have hit a clear stride yet, like it was still in the introductions stage. Martha’s feelings about her daughter who has run off, Victoria, are well-expressed, but since I as a reader didn’t get to see or meet Victoria for myself, I couldn’t connect with Martha’s sentiments about who her absent daughter is.

The novel’s strength is in its final fourth or so, and though it was a long time in coming, reading wise, it turned out to be enough to interest me in continuing on with the At Home in Trinity series.

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The next book in the At Home in Trinity series, The Midwife’s Choice, is scheduled to release in December 2015. The books are republications of novels first published in 2002 and 2003, originally titled A Place Called Trinity and Home to Trinity.

.The Midwife's Choice (At Home in Trinity #2)

Learning to Float: Memoir of a Caregiver-Husband by Allan Ament

Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me. Online Book Club provided me with a complimentary copy of this book for an honest review.
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Learning to Float
Learning to Float: Memoir of a Caregiver-Husband by Allan Ament

Biography/Memoir

Here’s a transparent, engaging, and inspiring narrative about one man’s experience caring for his wife after she suffers a stroke, a fitting read for anyone who believes in learning and growing through life’s challenges.

Officially reviewed at OnlineBookClub.org with 3 out of 4 stars. Feel free to take a look!

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Note to my blog readers: not out of keeping with the nature of the subject matter, this book contains a minimal amount of profanity.

Saving Sarah Cain (2007)

Film reviews are subjective. I tend to rate films not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me.
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Saving Sarah Cain

Saving Sarah Cain (2007) from Believe Pictures
Rated PG. Drama, Family Film, Faith, Romance
My rating: ★★★★1/2

Description (from the film case): Sarah Cain (Lisa Pepper) is sweet, successful, slightly self-absorbed and a city girl through and through. But when the untimely death of her sister draws her to Amish country for the funeral, she makes a discovery that will change her life: she is now the legal guardian to five Amish nieces and nephews! Desperately trying to juggle the kids, her career and her comfort level, Sarah must reevaluate her priorities as she prepares for the biggest culture shock of everyone’s lives!

My thoughts: I hope you excused the rather enthusiastic exclamation points (!) in the description. :-)

Here’s a clean and enjoyable movie with some fun and touching pieces mixed in. The changing of the title and a central plot element from that of the novel this story is based on both serve the movie well. The acting and pacing could’ve been tightened, particularly toward the beginning. And, though the actress is indeed a good crier, the tears of Lyddie’s character would have had more of an impact if they’d appeared in a fewer number of scenes. Still, it’s a movie I like watching over and over again.

While I’m aware of the central plot departure from the novel, The Redemption of Sarah Cain by Beverly Lewis, no, I haven’t actually read the book. I’ve mentioned before why I didn’t hop on the Amish novel wagon when many other Christian Fiction readers did, and I still only read a little of the subgenre, but after watching this movie, I wouldn’t be opposed to checking out the novel one day. With that said, Saving Sarah Cain can appeal to folks who aren’t necessarily Amish fiction or even faith film enthusiasts but who like good family stories that make you feel a little something.

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Once Upon a Summertime by Melody Carlson

Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me. Revell provided me with a complimentary copy of this book for an honest review.
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Once Upon a SummertimeOnce Upon a Summertime: A New York City Romance by Melody Carlson

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

(Click the title to find the book description/blurb.)

I believe Once Upon a Summertime is the third novel I’ve read during the past year or so about a young woman relocating to and landing a new job in New York City, and it’s the first book I’ve ever read by Melody Carlson. I almost felt like I myself could’ve been a tourist in The Big Apple as Anna Gordon and Sean O’Neil traversed the streets together.

This read is on the lighter side with one key relationship complication that isn’t so complicated. I wasn’t really pulled in by the characters, the writing tends toward redundancy in a number of places, and the ending is quite abrupt. Still, anyone looking for an easy and clean romance with an overall upbeat feel to it may want to pick this novel up.