The Time Mom Met Hitler, Frost Came to Dinner, and I Heard the Greatest Story Ever Told: A Memoir by Dikkon Eberhart

memoir-books

Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me. Tyndale House provided me with a complimentary copy of this book for an honest review.

Five Gold Stars

The Time Mom Met HitlerThe Time Mom Met Hitler, Frost Came to Dinner, and I Heard the Greatest Story Ever Told: A Memoir by Dikkon Eberhart

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

(Click the title to find the book description/blurb.)

Then she looked at me with that deep, human, gestative wisdom that many women have, and which I don’t.
“We know what we’ve lost. We don’t know what we’ve gained.”

Within and outside of its context concerning a certain newborn’s genetic condition, it could take me quite a minute to unpack an observation like the “lost and gained” one, spoken by the author’s wife. But there are a number of statements that gave me pause while reading The Time Mom Met Hitler, Frost Came to Dinner, and I Heard the Greatest Story Ever Told: A Memoir by Dikkon Eberhart. Yes, it’s a mouthful, and it’s one of those nuanced but personable, intelligent and beautiful memoirs that makes you think and evaluate life, especially your own.

Literature and poetry enthusiasts and artists can find particular pleasure in reading about how the author relates to literary greats, to the arts, and to his father, a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet. Added to that, the themes of struggling with one’s identity and looking for answers to longstanding inner turmoil are universal.

Though its desired effect wasn’t lost on me, I thought the amount of earlier material repeated word for word later on in the book was a little much.

Still, the memoir is wonderfully woven overall, as well as entertaining, human, and redemptive.

 

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One thought on “The Time Mom Met Hitler, Frost Came to Dinner, and I Heard the Greatest Story Ever Told: A Memoir by Dikkon Eberhart

  1. Pingback: Favorite Reads 2015 | Prismatic Prospects

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