Arts, Sports, Entertainment, and a World in Crisis Mode

I’ve written before about people deeming the work of others to be unimportant, particularly when it comes to people who work in different areas of entertainment. It seems the coronavirus pandemic has led to a new wave of finger-pointing regarding whose work matters, whose work doesn’t, and how this time of quarantining proves afresh that overpaid pro athletes and movie stars and the like are useless when the rubber meets the road.

Now, this post isn’t to raise a debate about how much money entertainers should or shouldn’t make.

Still, that doesn’t negate the fact that a lot of folks who enjoy the entertainment that athletes and actors provide willingly pay for that entertainment all the time. There’d be little money invested or made in professional sports and motion pictures and such if paying fans and audiences didn’t exist or weren’t interested.

Anyway, yeah, “your work doesn’t matter” finger-pointing hits a nerve in me, maybe more so because I’m an author. It seems plenty of people think of artists and writers as folks whose work isn’t all that necessary, and perhaps that way of thinking will continue right through this time when people are staying at home more than usual and watching more movies and TV series and reading more books—entertainment that wouldn’t exist without “useless” artists and writers.

Huh.

Well. When it comes to professional athletes, I don’t think the fact that many of them can’t presently engage in their work (the entertaining parts of the work that audiences see, anyway) means the athletes are useless any more than the fact that stage actors and artists who can’t presently engage in their work means those actors and artists are useless. The work required in arts and entertainment is hard, made even harder when your upcoming events are canceled and many ticket-holders understandably want their money back.

Again, I’m not judging how valuable entertainment is, monetary wise, or how much audiences should or shouldn’t pay for it. But I don’t think a temporary world crisis/survival mode that forces technical designations of Essential and Nonessential jobs means: “Anyone whose work isn’t listed as one of these Essential jobs is a useless worker.” Not at all.

And while I in no way mean to minimize the seriousness of an international pandemic, it doesn’t mean I think times of crisis are the only times that truly matter. There’d be little reason to get through a crisis if there wasn’t a preferable quality of life waiting on the other side of it.

What we do on the other side indeed matters, including the places and times when people gather together to work, to play, and to worship. To sing and dance and go to the movies. To go to school, to go to the library, or to go out to shop and eat together. To see stage plays, to attend concerts, to high-five and holler at sporting events, to be delighted and awed at the ballet. To go visit friends and family.

It’s all a part of life. Basic survival is super-important, yes, but that’s not all there is to living well. Not by a long shot.

So. Instead of using this time to put down all the Nonessential and “useless” workers out there, we’d be wise to let this experience remind us that it takes all kinds of work in the world to add to our overall quality of life—to make life not only worth surviving through but more worth living.

 

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