Create by Perry Elisabeth Kirkpatrick

Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me.

Create: An allegory for the misfit artists by Perry Elisabeth Kirkpatrick

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

(Click the title to find the book description/blurb.)

Well, no, I’ve not really written much of a book review, here.

This is one of those super-short stories about which I’d rather say very little, to keep the story’s few words as fresh as possible for other readers.

But this is indeed an allegory for misfit artists: a quick, almost ethereal read that was just the kind of lift this misfit creative needed when she found it. A dose of “keep going” to keep me going.

It’s worth the few minutes it takes to breathe it in.

 

Rescued: An Allegory by Tracy L. Higley

Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me.

rescuedRescued: An Allegory by Tracy L. Higley

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

(Click the title to find the book description/blurb.)

The end of this hall glowed like fire…and she knew, as long as it had been since she had seen it, that it was the sun at the end of that hall. The sun and the air and…the knight.

So begins the release of a woman once imprisoned, now free to follow a wise and compassionate knight toward the kingdom and the King awaiting them in Rescued: An Allegory by author Tracy L. Higley.

It’s easy to identify with the journey in this short story, a rather simple illustration of the joys, the trials, the battles, and the assurance in a life of faith. The author takes a poetic approach to the tale, and some of the symbolism in the reading gave me a feeling much like I’ve had with The Chronicles of Narnia. Here’s a story suitable for ChristFic readers to take a one-sitting break with for a quick boost of encouragement.

Her efforts could earn her no more love because there was no more love to be had. She had it all…

 

Into the Canyon by Michael Neale

fiction-books-4 nadine keels

Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me. BookLook Bloggers provided me with a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher for an honest review.

Four Silver Stars

Into the CanyonInto the Canyon by Michael Neale

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

(Click the title to find the book description/blurb.)

Hope, that’s what our souls need… The River gave me what I could not give myself…a reason.

Sweet cinnamon, what a refreshing read. I’m not even an outdoorsy type, most of the time, but Into the Canyon took me straight there, right into the wonder of God’s open, living creation, with fantastic imagery from author Michael Neale. And, hey, the book’s awesome cover didn’t do a bad job at all of setting the stage for the story.

Admission: I turned on waterfall “white noise” to play in the background while I read much of this novel, but even without my added sound effects, I could have been standing right at The River’s edge by way of the images Neale uses to bring Gabriel’s story of love, fears, forgiveness, and abundant living to life. Blake’s soul-searching account blends in well, and his sentiment while out on the water in Gabriel’s enlightening world makes sense: “It was like one part of me started to die and one part of me started to awaken from the dead.”

While Gabriel has fear, grief, and anger issues to work through as a young man, it seems that his turning point is more or less glossed over, that we see him struggle during specific events and express his doubts to Ezra about whether to believe in God, and then the narrator just tells us that Gabriel’s perspective is changing, instead of, perhaps, giving us another specific event or words from young Gabriel to show us how the change in his thinking begins. Also, the use of “The River” metaphor/phrase does get somewhat repetitive.

Yet, the journey into the canyon is worth taking, and I’d encourage readers not to “try” to read into the novel but to let the story find them where it finds them, to be refreshed by it.

It’s important to share our stories. It helps us know we aren’t alone.

_______________________

Before Into the Canyon comes The River. Click the cover to take a look.

The River