Single Sashimi by Camy Tang

chick-lit-books-2

Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me.

Five Gold Stars

Single SashimiSingle Sashimi by Camy Tang

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

(Click the title to find the book description/blurb.)

This was who she wished to be…
The sight took her breath away, while at the same time a part inside her scolded for how much she enjoyed being beautiful.

Venus Chau. A driven businesswoman in a constant fight for professional respect, particularly respect from men. She’s not exactly the softest or most charming of personalities. Some find her intimidating. And, hey, she even intimidates herself–that is, when she glimpses the glory of her femininity, she does.

Single Sashimi is the second book I’ve read in the Sushi Series by author Camy Tang, and I must say I got emotionally involved in the heroine’s drive, her challenges, her insecurities, her breaking point. I laughed, I steamed, and I got so balled up during the story’s displays of (non-romantic) love and surrender that I felt like part of my soul was sobbing. Beautiful execution on the author’s part.

And, it’s rare that I say this–if I’ve ever said this in a book review at all–but I actually found the hero in this book to be, well, hotness. In the romances I read, whether they’re romance novels or other kinds of novels with a romantic thread in the story, I don’t find the hero attractive just because the heroine or other characters or the narrator keep telling me that he’s attractive, just because he has broad shoulders or flashes his winning smile or smoky scowl around and makes the heroine’s heart race. But to create a passionate but tempered and mature character who isn’t perfect but who knows how to think fast and do some key right things at the right times… Hey, not even romantic things, necessarily; just the right things.

Anywho. The hero here has my respect as more than just a male figure included to play opposite a female for a story’s romantic purposes.

Yup, I’ve got more reading of this series to do.

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Okay, so I wrote this review before I read the next and last book in the Sushi Series, Weddings and Wasabi, which I’ve read now and also rated with 5 stars.
I’ve also read and enjoyed the first book in the series, Sushi for One?

Sushi for One? (Sushi, #1) Only Uni (Sushi, #2) Weddings and Wasabi (Sushi, #4)

 

Sushi for One? by Camy Tang

Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me.

Sushi for OneSushi for One? by Camy Tang

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

(Click the title to find the book description/blurb.)

“Please do something.” She’d wait for Him to do something. She’d wait for Him, even if He didn’t do something.

It’s a little complicated, this whole business regarding Lex Sakai’s becoming (or avoiding becoming?) the oldest single female cousin in her family. Her quest of multiple objectives in Sushi for One? by author Camy Tang takes a lot of turns, and I, while reading about it, had to hang on for the ride.

The novel’s opening, and several other moments along the way, had me laughing out loud, and I took to the heroine right away: funny, flawed, sometimes rash about the mouth, tomboyish, passionate about sports, with a figure folks criticize for not being curvy enough–whatever that is. (Hey, lithe women are beautiful, too!) The story’s romance is well paced, and the volleyball sequences put me in the mood for the Summer Olympics. In the mood to watch them, that is.

There are a lot of mishaps and spillings, the theme concerning Lex’s sensitive stomach makes for some “disgustamundo” parts, and most of the zany characters who sail through, and some who reappear, aren’t exactly likable. (Which is part of the story’s point, granted.) But genuine displays of friendship and family loyalty through painful experience put me in tears. Real tears that required me to pause from reading for a while.

I’ve got to read more of the Sushi Series.

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Since writing this review, I have indeed read and reviewed more books in the Sushi Series:
Single Sashimi
Weddings and Wasabi

Only Uni (Sushi, #2) Single Sashimi (Sushi, #3) Weddings and Wasabi (Sushi, #4)

 

Prelude for a Lord by Camille Elliot

Regency Books 3

Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me. BookLook Bloggers provided me with a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher for an honest review.

Prelude for a LordPrelude for a Lord by Camille Elliot

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

(Click the title to find the book description/blurb.)

Why must people insist on telling her what she could not do?

Before reading Prelude for a Lord, I never would’ve imagined that playing a violin would have been considered inappropriate for a woman in Regency England. But for Lady Alethea Sutherton to already be something of an outcast in her society–on account of her unmarried state at twenty-eight years, her tallness, and her independent ways of thinking–moving her body around so much in order to play a violin must have been quite the peculiar icing on the cake.

Now, in case you might not have guessed so by looking at the book cover, this novel includes quite a bit of action and suspense, and I was enthralled by the depth of passion author Camille Elliot infused into her portrayal of Alethea and Lord Dommick’s relationship. They aren’t two people who are merely attracted physically or are thrown into lovesick tizzies on account of each other, but they understand each other, they’re mutually strengthened by the thought and presence of one another. Then, not to mention the vivid and moving imagery wrapped up in this novel’s music, which drew my senses deeper into the story.

Some parts of the book did get a little tedious to me, and the mentioning of Alethea’s hurt and loneliness seemed repetitive at spots instead of revealing something new about her to progress the story, but the tension, the longing, the artistry, and the romance of the rest made up for that.

All in all, a superb read!