Crystal by Walter Dean Myers

Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me.

Book cover image courtesy of FictionDB.com

Crystal by Walter Dean Myers

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

(Click the title to find the book description/blurb.)

“Modeling is a tough racket. You have to put up with a lot of garbage. You’re earning this money.”

Crystal is at the beginning of a glamorous modeling career in New York City. But what begins as an exciting experience for the sixteen-year-old becomes more than she bargained for in Crystal by author Walter Dean Myers.

I first read this YA novel back in my adolescence. Although the latest edition I read this time may have more than one detail updated from the edition I read decades ago, I can still see why the story painted such an accessible picture for me back then. It says enough, and ultimately hits pretty hard, without spelling everything out.

Yes, this is a story about the entertainment industry, modeling intersecting with television and movies, but of course, the importance is in Crystal’s journey of self-discovery. And what I understand more this time around is an aspect of the pressure of Crystal’s opportunity where her parents are concerned. Now, there were places where I didn’t get the best sense of Crystal’s personality, and this isn’t a sparkling tale with a happy-go-lucky ending, but it’s a compelling one.

This may be the only novel I read by this late author back in the day, but I plan on trying at least a little more of his work.

__________
Note to my blog readers: this novel contains some sensual material related to modeling and show business, although the content isn’t too explicit.

__________

A copy of the 1989 mass market paperback edition pictured above was the first one I read. I prefer that cover because sometimes characters in the story think Crystal is mixed, or that she’s something other than Black, which adds its own nuance to the racial aspect of the story.
The 2002 edition pictured below is the one I read this time.