Giveaway: The Movement of Crowns

Fantasy

Is it the perfect or the worst time for the kingdom to…change?
The Movement of Crowns by Nadine C. Keels

“The author has done an excellent job by blending a love angle with…war and power.” ~Readers’ Favorite

Find the giveaway for this book in the Faith, Hope, and Book Love group on Facebook.
Giveaway ends April 28, 2017.

The Blood Moons: Wrath of Elijah by Kachi Ugo

Fantasy 3

Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me. I received a free copy of this book from the author for an honest review.
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The Blood Moons: Wrath of Elijah by Kachi Ugo

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

(Click the title to find the book description/blurb.)

“I am Angelus Mikhail, servant of Elohim. Your life has been weighed with the Scales of Yeshua and you have been found worthy of the Wrath of Elijah. Follow me.”

Growing up in the slums of Ajegunle, twelve-year-old Johnny Akinwale has always been feverish on a frequent basis. Johnny’s doctors were never aware that his fevers are the effects of an ancient power he possesses as a descendant of the biblical prophet Elijah. Once Johnny learns of his power and true ancestry, he’s pulled into a mission with other young warriors to thwart an evil scheme of epic destruction in The Blood Moons: Wrath of Elijah by author Kachi Ugo.

While this is a middle grade fantasy with juvenile readability, I was very much drawn to this tale and remained engrossed as I read.

There’s a richness and balance to the story: a boy who finds it hard not to hate his impoverished life and his neglectful parents, even as he knows he’s destined for greatness. Coming into his supernatural power doesn’t release him of all natural rules, such as his having to get to school on time. And even with its dangerous, high-stakes adventure, the story makes room for humor that had me laughing out loud.

The illustrations toward the beginning of the book are a nice bonus! It would’ve been great if they’d continued throughout the story.

I found the development to be a tad awkward in places, particularly in an instance where foreshadowing might have helped. There are several grammar and technical errors in the book, along with one word choice I wouldn’t deem appropriate for a children’s book. However, my main disappointment was in finding that the story essentially ends with a cliffhanger. Even if the first book in a series may not tie up the loose ends of a subplot or two, I prefer a book to have a complete story where the main plot is resolved by the end.

I’d like to continue this series—but not because the cliffhanger left me hanging. I’m truly interested to know what will happen with Johnny and the other young Descendants of the Patriarchs.

Rose of Prophecy by Hope Ann

Fantasy 5

Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me.
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Four Silver Stars

rose-of-prophecyRose of Prophecy: A Beauty and the Beast Novella by Hope Ann

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

(Click the title to find the book description/blurb.)

She must take the ring and return before the seventh day…the seventh day…the seventh…
The whispering ceased.
And the darkness trembled with the sound of weeping.

Rose of Prophecy by author Hope Ann had been on my radar for quite a few months. But knowing that it was a retelling of Beauty and the Beast, I had some reservations about reading it. Although I once fell in love with one rendition of the well-known fairy tale (thank you, Disney, for the tale as old as time!), the “captive women falling in love with their captors” motif doesn’t exactly garner my greatest appreciation.

However, upon my recent resolution to start reading more fantasy again, I decided to finally give this novella a try. And I must say, the author’s handling of the beast’s predicament put me more at ease with this version of the story: a retelling infused with a scriptural theme.

The development of the first leg of the story made me feel as though I’d been plunged into a world I was already supposed to be a little familiar with but wasn’t. But I caught on before long, and though it took some time before the story really gained my interest, it eventually did. I like how there’s a different reason for this Beauty being “Beauty,” and, hey, I’m all for authors including characters named Nadine, even if they play minor roles. (Heeheehee.)

This quick read turned out to be an enjoyable stop on my Gradual Quest to More Fantasy.

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Rose of Prophecy is Book One in the Legends of Light series.

Song of the Sword: A Rapunzel Novella (Legends of Light #2)

Fairest by Gail Carson Levine

Fantasy 2

Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me.
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Four Silver Stars

fairestFairest by Gail Carson Levine

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

(Click the title to find the book description/blurb.)

“Foolishness may have golden offspring. I hope yours does.”
I did too.

Aza might have the most unusual and loveliest voice in all of Ayortha, a kingdom of singers. But because so many people–including Aza herself–consider her to be ugly, she’ll go to foolish lengths in her attempts to magically become pretty in Fairest, a novel by Gail Carson Levine.

Oh, fairy tales aren’t my go-to type of reading, and I don’t reach for many middle grade books to read either. But I once saw and enjoyed the movie Ella Enchanted, based (loosely?) on the Newbery Honor book by the same author. As I used to read more fantasy as a child, it’s been my plan for some time to dip back into fantasy fiction of the mythical and magical variety. So, when I happened to come across this novel, I figured, “Hey. Why not?”

This fantastical tale turned out to be quite engaging with excellent drops of genius along the way. There’s blackmail, betrayal, and some violence, but also endearing kindness and romance in the story, along with Aza’s down-to-earth lesson that young people (and, I daresay, grown folks as well) can learn from. The novel didn’t leave me with a Chronicles-of-Narnia kind of “wooow,” but still, every minute of it was worthwhile to me.

So, I’ll say this book is my small, happy step back into the mythical and magical side of things. 🙂