World of the Innocent Release Day!

Love, enduring belief, and the meaning of innocence—based on a true story…

“Beautifully written… It’s a novel for anyone who loves.” ~Christian Bookaholic

It’s Release Day!
The Kindle Edition of my literary love story, World of the Innocent, is now available at Amazon.
You can pick up a copy for a special new release price, or read it free with Kindle Unlimited.

World of the Innocent at Amazon

The paperback edition is also available at my eStore, Amazon, and Barnes and Noble.

World of the Innocent: A Love Story

World of the Innocent
A Novella

“Beautifully written. It spoke to my soul… It’s a novel for anyone who loves.” ~Christian Bookaholic
“Keels has written a lovely, blossoming romantic story… Packed with emotions, this was a heartfelt read.” ~Brice’s Mice Christian Book Reviews

“I went in with an open mind and I was not disappointed.” ~The Kansan Reader

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“Are you ready to love this young man?”

Jhoi: she’s poetic. She’s guarded. And she couldn’t imagine having much to do with a guy like Marcas. Sure, Marcas is a brilliant fellow artist, admired by plenty of fans. But he’s so remarkably…strange.

Still, Marcas touches Jhoi’s soul. And through the counsel of a shrewd old neighbor, Jhoi will discover a link between intimate friendship and becoming a steward of an era.

A tale of love, enduring belief, and the meaning of innocence—based on a true story.

~~~

Find World of the Innocent in print at the following eStore, at Amazon, and at Barnes and Noble.
Also available in the Kindle Store at Amazon for purchase, or free with Kindle Unlimited.

And I Shall Be Healed by Julia Lee Dean

war-books

Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me. Online Book Club provided me with a complimentary copy of this book for an honest review.
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And I Shall Be Healed

And I Shall Be Healed by Julia Lee Dean

Literary Fiction, Historical Fiction, World War I

Multilayered, well thought-out, and beautifully woven. I don’t read an abundance of literary fiction, but this novel kept me engrossed from beginning to end–and what an ending.

Officially reviewed at OnlineBookClub.org with 4 out of 4 stars. Take a look!

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Notes for my blog readers: not out of keeping with the nature of the subject matter, this book contains some gruesome war details and a minimal amount of profanity. While it has religious themes and a redemptive quality, this novel is not of the Christian Fiction genre.

Chasing the Butterfly by Jayme H. Mansfield

historical-books-5

Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me. I received a free copy of this book, for which I give my honest review, through Goodreads First Reads.
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Five Gold Stars

Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000038_00063]Chasing the Butterfly by Jayme H. Mansfield

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

(Click the title to find the book description/blurb.)

In Chasing the Butterfly, debut fiction author Jayme H. Mansfield brings out wonderfully realized imagery and emotion as well as a cast of flawed people, Mansfield’s deft style causing the reader to view this story chiefly set in France as its heroine Ella Moreau would: as if through the eyes of an artist.

The effects of Ella’s mother’s abandonment of the Moreau family, the tragedy of World War II, and the pleasures and pains of Ella’s growth as a young woman and a gifted painter come through, at times, enigmatically, but effortlessly on the whole. Mansfield weaves together the complexities of human relationships, of love and loss, confusion and hope, as well as the oppression of guilt and the power of forgiveness.

On a minor note, I suspect that Remy’s theme might have had a more definite impact if a little more time was given to his character before the war instead of mainly after it. Also, as something I find in many novels, it’s a bit strange when pronouns for God are sometimes capitalized, sometimes not, unless the inconsistency is intentionally included to reflect characters’ different perceptions of Him, which I didn’t particularly see to be the case in this novel.

This poignant story culminates into an almost impossibly beautiful finish and an affirmation of tried love’s capacity, and I wouldn’t at all mind reading more from this author in the future. Brava!