Most Truly by Reina M. Williams

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Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me.
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Most TrulyMost Truly by Reina M. Williams

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

(Click the title to find the book description/blurb.)

What might have happened to Elizabeth Bennet’s younger sister, Kitty, and Mr. Darcy’s cousin, Colonel Fitzwilliam, after Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice? Author Reina M. Williams answers that question in her Love at Pemberley novella, Most Truly.

Well. I took the plunge.

I’ve never been easy with the idea of late sequels to classics, not written by a classic’s original author. But I gave this little romance a go, and it was a quick, pleasant read.

I liked the inclusion of Kitty’s uncertainty about how to carry out her own new attitude, though the number of mentions concerning her getting past her former silliness did become redundant. And, as Alfred, Lord Tennyson praised Austen for being “a great artist,” saying, “Miss Austen understood the smallness of life to perfection,” there is indeed an art to writing of the smallness of life without a story merely seeming slow or uneventful. I did find parts of this novella to be slow.

Nevertheless, the simple plot kept me interested as I imagined the characters as I frequently see them in the 1995 BBC miniseries production of Pride and Prejudice. Though I’m pretty sure I’ll still decline to read any direct retellings of Austen’s original novels, I’m a little–just a little–more open now to the thought of creative continuations.

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Most Truly is Book One in the Love at Pemberley series.

Miss Darcy Decides (Love at Pemberley, #2) Miss Bennet Blooms (Love at Pemberley, #3) Misunderstood: A Pride and Prejudice Novella (Love at Pemberley, #4)

Dying for Love by Cara Putman

Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me. I received a complimentary copy of this book, for which I’ve given an honest review.
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Dying for Love by Cara Putman

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

(Click the title to find the book description/blurb.)

“Anything of value is worth a fight.”

Ciara Turner and David Evans once failed to make a go of their personal relationship, since their attorney roles often put them on opposing sides of family cases. But when they discover a judge they both admire has been murdered, they’ll have to work together on the investigation in Dying for Love by author Cara Putman.

Hmm. Kinda did a double-take there, as the official book blurb keeps mentioning “Daniel.” The character’s name is David.

Anyhow, I wanted to read this novella before reading the first novel in the Hidden Justice romantic suspense series. Or is it a legal thriller series? Well, I’m a fan of both!

While I would’ve liked to get a more convincing sense of the guilty party’s motive here, why this particular culprit had taken so drastic a step as murder, I think I was into the suspense side of the story more than the romantic one. I found the romance tricky to follow emotionally, but it also seemed redundant in places, with some thoughts and doubts being rehashed a time or two more than was needed.

Still, the story has put me in anticipation to continue this romantic-suspense-legal-thriller series, which I’ll be doing soon.

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Dying for Love is the beginning novella in the Hidden Justice series.

  

Illusionary by Desiree Williams

Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me. I received a free copy of this book from the author for an honest review.
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Illusionary by Desiree Williams

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

(Click the title to find the book description/blurb.)

A tumble down the stairs lands Kamryn into a different world, the Land of Ur, where she meets a handsome storyteller who can bring stories to life. The storyteller takes Kamryn to the Oracle, who gives Kam a dangerous rescue mission to complete before she can get back home. But the mission proves to be much more than it appears to be in Illusionary, a novel by author Desiree Williams.

Awe. Some. Ness. I wasn’t ready.

I mean, the book starts out cute and funny (and Kam is a pretty funny heroine throughout, by the way.) Then the parallel world escapades begin. I’ll confess that it took me a while to catch up with the romance, as I didn’t enter as quickly or deeply into “the feelings” as the heroine and hero did. And my overall interest waned a tad through some of the traveling and in-between parts.

But the story would stop me in my tracks in places, sometimes with a single, spoken word. “Heal.” “Hope.”

“But hope…now that’s a mighty thing,” Kamryn says. You’ve got that right, sister! And before and after a crucial twist, this story presents an assortment of other wonderfully woven themes: growing up and innocence, grief and illness and regret, finding out who you really are and what you’re capable of. True bravery!

It’s a fantasy tale like The Chronicles of Narnia in that it’ll speak to you on multiple levels if you have the ears to hear it—but whether you go to those other levels or not, it’s still a darn good adventure.

And I’ll have you all know, I had to push past imminent tears to even write this review. Good grief, Desiree Williams…

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Illusionary Blog Tour Giveaway!
Ultimate Book Lover’s Grand Prize

The winner of the giveaway will be selected on Monday, June 12th at approximately 9 AM (EST). The winner will be announced on Desiree Williams’s Facebook and Twitter pages.

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Weaver’s Needle by Robin Caroll

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Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me. I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Publishing and was under no obligation to write a review.
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Four Silver Stars

Weaver's NeedleWeaver’s Needle by Robin Caroll

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

(Click the title to find the book description/blurb.)

A well-off widow recruits two recovery specialists, Landry and Nickolai, pitting them against each other to earn a substantial fee to recover a stolen map. While searching for the coveted map to a hidden and legendary gold mine, Landry and Nickolai may be growing too close for comfort–especially when the search could have deadly consequences in Weaver’s Needle, a novel by author Robin Caroll.

This novel’s cover is what most drew me to the story. The cover has a sense of adventure and danger, but it isn’t dark. You can almost feel the blaze of the dry and scorching sun in the bold and vivid design that screams “romantic suspense.”

Overall, I found this adventure entertaining. The plot kept me curious, and Landry and Nickolai each have crucial, believable reasons for wanting to earn the recovery fee they’re competing for.

Now, I thought some of the romantic thoughts and feelings in the story didn’t quite ring true. It seems to me that unless he or she is completely inexperienced, a grown man or woman wouldn’t be super shocked or confused by a growing attraction to someone attractive, particularly when the two are working closely together. Also, I’ve never really been keen on the “I can’t be with him/her because he/she isn’t a Christian” theme in novels, as it tends to muddy the characters’ faith/romantic motives to me. And, interesting as it was, I almost felt a little let down by the story’s ending.

Still, many fellow fans of Christian romantic suspense should enjoy this novel, and I wouldn’t mind reading this new-to-me author again.