Rescued: An Allegory by Tracy L. Higley

Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me.

rescuedRescued: An Allegory by Tracy L. Higley

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

(Click the title to find the book description/blurb.)

The end of this hall glowed like fire…and she knew, as long as it had been since she had seen it, that it was the sun at the end of that hall. The sun and the air and…the knight.

So begins the release of a woman once imprisoned, now free to follow a wise and compassionate knight toward the kingdom and the King awaiting them in Rescued: An Allegory by author Tracy L. Higley.

It’s easy to identify with the journey in this short story, a rather simple illustration of the joys, the trials, the battles, and the assurance in a life of faith. The author takes a poetic approach to the tale, and some of the symbolism in the reading gave me a feeling much like I’ve had with The Chronicles of Narnia. Here’s a story suitable for ChristFic readers to take a one-sitting break with for a quick boost of encouragement.

Her efforts could earn her no more love because there was no more love to be had. She had it all…

 

Royal Beauty by Tracy Higley

biblical-books-3

Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me.

Royal BeautyRoyal Beauty by Tracy L. Higley

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

(Click the title to find the book description/blurb.)

“Regulus, the king star. Circling Jupiter, the king planet, like a crown. All of it inside the constellation of the lion. It signifies that a great king has been born in the land of the Jews.”

What began as a quest through Arabian sands for a relic of legendary power, and heightened into a violent race for supremacy, now culminates in the search for a Savior in Royal Beauty by author Tracy Higley.

Like the books that precede it in The Incense Road trilogy, this book isn’t a standalone. It turns its spotlight on Kamillah, an Egyptian princess and a woman of mystery, traveling with the young mage and the general who’ve vied for her affections. She’s leery of a menacing power that she wields but that also keeps her enslaved, and her objective is to secure her freedom in Jerusalem, even if it will leave blood on her hands.

This leg of the journey doesn’t have the Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark flavor that its related books have, and that’s perfectly all right, since the story must shift to the true source and purpose of power. The book brings an interesting take on the age-old tale of the magi following a star to find a world ruler, and it rightly illustrates the danger of taking on such a mission under the nose of a sitting king. The human story continues here as well, baring the characters’ needs for understanding and belonging. For love, in its various forms.

I’d recommend this trilogy to readers who’ll appreciate adventure and intrigue woven with deep matters of the heart, as well as to anyone who’d like to experience this story in a broader context, beyond a baby in a manger.

____________________

Here’s my review of Book One in The Incense Road trilogy, Star of Wonder.

Star of Wonder  Star of Night

 

Star of Night by Tracy Higley

war-books-2

Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me.

Star of NightStar of Night by Tracy L. Higley

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

(Click the title to find the book description/blurb.)

“Fighting each other. It makes no sense, but that is what this senseless quest has brought us. From the time we stopped following the star we have been doomed to this.”

The stars over the Arabian sands have heralded the coming of a new world ruler, and ambition, tension, desperation, and violence heighten on the race to secure power in Star of Night by author Tracy Higley.

The significance of the strife that unfolds here is rooted in the book that precedes this one, and it’s necessary to read The Incense Road trilogy in order. Necessary, and in my eyes so far, worth it. I’ll admit there seemed to be a missing link in the chain of emotion somewhere in the first quarter or third of this book, but I didn’t feel lost for long.

As the adventure that still reminds me of Aladdin and Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark continues, the human story develops further as well. This time, it goes deeper into the conflicted and questioning heart of Reza, a general of the Persian king, unsure of the revolution he’s leading, struggling in his friendship with Misha, the young mage who can hear the star that beckons toward Jerusalem.

Sure, I already know something about where this perilous and spiritual journey of epic import must be leading. (Thank you, Christmas!) But the growing weight of the personal stakes the characters have in this has intrigued me all the more to see how the story will ultimately culminate. On to Book Three…

___________________

Here’s my review of Book Three in The Incense Road trilogy, Royal Beauty.

Star of Wonder  Royal Beauty

 

Star of Wonder by Tracy Higley

historical-books

Book reviews are subjective. I tend to rate books not according to how “perfect” they are, seem to be, or are said to be in general but rather to how perfect they are to me.

Star of WonderStar of Wonder by Tracy L. Higley

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

(Click the title to find the book description/blurb.)

It was easy to see how Zahir had put this document together with the positioning of the regal star and its indication of a birth unlike any the world had seen. A ruler to rule the nations.

I don’t know what all I was expecting when I picked up Star of Wonder by author Tracy Higley. That is, I figured The Incense Road trilogy would be the road leading to the birth of Christ, but besides that, my space for expectations was pretty blank.

I was unprepared for the stirring adventure this story on the sands of Arabia becomes, something bringing Aladdin and Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark to my mind. It’s a story of heritage and the need for acceptance, of intrigues for power and position, and of a young, first-level mage’s quest for “an object of power that could sway the course of nations.” Granted, Misha-el, the mage, is more concerned with the object of power for his ailing mother’s sake than for the fate of nations.

Now, I didn’t get a full grip on the story’s pacing. It was a bit difficult for me to make complete sense of some of the earlier action, as certain parts felt rushed or vague, but I also lost a measure of interest in the details during a couple of slow parts. Still, overall, I found this novella to be a pleasant, and rather fascinating, surprise.

I think, for anyone who finishes the first stage of this star-led journey, it’d be nigh on impossible not to want to go on to read the next book on the Incense Road.

______________

Here’s my review of Book Two in The Incense Road trilogy, Star of Night.

Star of Night  Royal Beauty